Naturalistic Paganism

Category: nature


Revolutionary Ideas for Imbolc, by Renee Lehnen

Like simplicity and socialism, Paganism, Naturalism, and Humanism, are also very old, very good ideas. They offer us spiritual sustenance and inspire courage to try old and new ideas as we dig ourselves out of a planet-sized pile of our own night soil. I think afternoon skaters and readers of Humanistic Paganism know that already. Have a blessed Imbolc!

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Naturalistic Paganism’s Spectral Challenge – Part One: A Haunted Landscape, by Emile Wayne

If we wish to be re-bodied, made subjects, and called-into-being through our relationship to place, we must do so with the knowledge that the land holds the memory of suffering bodies, of exploitation, dispossession, abuse, lynching, poverty, and a whole host of other specters, all of which arose out of the wounds that are our collective history. We must be ready to listen to the voices of the specters haunting the land and our histories, even if those voices call out to some of us in rebuke.

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A Shinto Experience in New Zealand by Megan Manson

It may seem strange that one of the most profoundly Shinto experiences I’ve had was in New Zealand. The whole trip, from the cave’s entrance to the meditative atmosphere of the glowworm chamber, felt like a pilgrimage to a particularly powerful Shinto shrine. To me, this visit to Te Ana-Au Glowworm Caves demonstrated how universal the concept behind Shinto – the sense of respect and awe we feel in the face of Nature’s wonders – really is, and that the kami themselves truly are to be found everywhere.

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“Plants as Aliens”, by Brock Haussamen

Plants are so familiar to us that we don’t see them very well. We look at them and think about them according mostly to how we use them—for food and beauty. To shift our perspective, I’ll look at plants as if they were strangers from another planet, as plant-aliens. Making them weirder may make them more vivid.

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Hear the Ocean Speak to You, Mere Mortal!

Our Ancestors realized our ties to the ocean time and time again, with the ocean represented as a goddess (Namaka) or god (Lir, ) dozens of times – in addition to non-human representations, such as dragons, snakes, monsters, etc.

But we don’t even need a separate name. He is the Ocean!!! Hear the ocean speak to you, mere mortal!

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