Naturalistic Paganism

Category: nature


Building a Land Shrine, by Anna Walther

why build a land shrine?
Why build a land shrine? Because I felt called to, and because it makes me happy. The shrine is a place for me to pay respect to the land beneath my feet and the other beings with whom I share it. A place for me to express wonder and gratitude for the vast underground Edwards Aquifer that supplies my water, the rocky soil that grows some of my food and provides a foundation for my home, the humid air and searing sunlight that surround my body and sustain life. A specific place where I can continue meeting and growing relationship with other animals, plants, and minerals. A physical focus for observation, prayer, and offerings.

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Sacred Springs, Part 2 by Anna Walther

In “Sacred Springs, Part 1,” I described my first visit to Barton Springs, the most famous limestone springs in Austin, and explored the role that Barton and other major Edwards Aquifer springs play in indigenous spirituality. But there are many other artesian springs along Austin-area limestone creeks, including a small, unnamed spring just a mile from my home, near the headwaters of Walnut Creek in Northwest Austin. Last summer I spent time there grounded and centered, with senses wide open.

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Inoculative Libations to the Land By Rua Lupa

Whatever comes from Nature is of Nature, no matter its form or its location. Nothing is separate from Nature. The ritual here helps to ensure that our connections within Nature are harmonious and encourage life, instead of ignoring the workings of Nature and inadvertently cause disharmony.

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[Pagan in Place] “Home Base Practice” by Anna Walther

The elements, plants, animals, and seasonal patterns that inspire my practice manifest in specific places; therefore I must be grounded in a specific place in order to interact with them.

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“Four Devotional Practices for Naturalistic Pagans” by Anna Walther

In my place-based, Naturalistic Paganism, I relate most often to nature powers. Humans around the world share the old, great powers: the abundance of the Earth, the strength and direction of the Wind, the Sun’s relentless fire. Other powers are younger and local: the bluebonnets that push up through the soil each spring, Central Texas’s many limestone creeks and springs, and even the water that flows through the tap of my own kitchen sink. I am always in relationship with these powers, whether I will it or not. My goal as a Pagan is to cultivate mindful relationships with these nature powers. I do not believe that the springs in any sense needed or wanted my offering, but I was different for having made it.

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