Naturalistic Paganism

Category: Lupa


Psych Meds, Self-Care and Paganism, by Lupa Greenwolf

You’ll notice that in the graphic at the top of this post I made my own modifications to the original meme. I state that both nature and psych meds are “one of many tools for managing mental illness.” When it comes to living with an illness–any illness–I believe it’s important to make as many options available as possible. That means that I see the nature/meds situation as a both/and one, not either/or.

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“Is Anyone Else Getting Weird Vibes?”: On Confirmation Bias and Emotional States, by Lupa Greenwolf

It’s okay to want to not feel alone in your thoughts and feelings. But remember that we humans share a lot of common experiences. And it’s natural for us to feel empathy for others in the same situation we’re in: welcome to being a social species of ape. We evolved this connection to each other over millions of years, and we share it with lots of other species, too.

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Honoring our Ancestors – Racism Rears it’s head, by Lupa Greenwolf & Jon Cleland Host

I hope we, as Pagans, can move past the harmful views of the AFA toward a better word for everyone, with recognition that we are all of mixed race. I’m white and privileged, and I’m proud to count Africans, Asians, and so many colors of wonderful human beings among my Ancestors, whom I thank every day.

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Dear Pagans: Please Stop Abusing Science, by Lupa Greenwolf

I have a deep spiritual path that gives me a structure for personal meaning and creating a place for myself in this world. But my work with totems does not overwrite my understanding of the physical animals, plants and other beings out there in the world. If anything, it is natural history that informs my deeper connection with the spirits I work with, because I know where they’re rooted.

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It’s Easy to be Pagan in the Wild, by Lupa Greenwolf

It’s easy to be pagan in the wild. It’s easy to find the heart of a nature-based pagan path when you’re immersed in a quiet forest or secluded desert highway. Connecting with the divine is a simpler act when your breath catches at the sight of a graceful doe or soaring raptor. But what about deep within cities, with graffiti-tinged cement and stinking hot asphalt under the burning summer sun? Where is the sacred in a clearcut, or a landfill, or a mountaintop mine?

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